Category Archives: Oil and Gas Safety

The deal with worker safety in oil and gas

With an oil strike in Turner Valley, Alberta launched Canada’s energy industry in the early 1900s. Resources were abundant, but experience was in short supply. Workers were expected to learn on the job—and avoid the dangers of a drilling rig’s many moving and often oil-slicked parts: pulleys, wheels, cogs, belts, gears, chains, ropes, planks, tools and equipment. Continue reading

Bad behaviour behind the wheel

Avoiding road rage and hyper-aggressive driving

Once fall hits, the summer vibes end abruptly with the grind of back-to-school routines, longer commutes and endless traffic. We need to get where we’re going fast and the person ahead is going way… too… slow. When tempers flare behind the wheel our reactions can range from honking horns, muttering expletives, to full-blown road rage.

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Deadly distractions

Momentary lapses of attention while driving can be fatal

Texting a message, reaching for a cup of coffee or changing the radio station.

All innocent enough­­––unless you’re doing them while driving.

These actions can become deadly distractions on the road. Continue reading

Oil and gas industry determined to buck a safety trend

Claim rates usually rise as activity increases

The downside of an uptick in oil and gas activity is this: injury rates in young, new employees go up. A lot.

After the 2008/2009 recession, Enform analyzed data from the Alberta Workers’ Compensation Board and Statistics Canada. It found that by 2012, the industry’s workforce had increased by 25 per cent (based on person-years). But the injury claim rate had increased by 29 per cent. And the claim rate among workers 15 to 24 years old had soared by 94 per cent. Continue reading

Zero is within energy industry’s grasp

Average claim rates drop 60% or more in 15 years

Zero. Nothing. Nada. Nil.

By definition, zero is the only whole number that is neither positive nor negative. That changes dramatically when you’re talking about safety.

Zero is the ultimate positive goal in Canada’s oil and gas industry. No injuries. No lost lives. No lost production. No loss of equipment. Continue reading

A health and safety executive recounts her son’s injury in oil and gas

First safety was professional. Then it was personal

In the 1980s, safety was professional for Maureen Shaw. And then in the 1990s, it became deeply personal.

Shaw had worked for years in occupational health and safety, including in the oil and gas industry.

But she never imagined those risks would strike so close to home. Continue reading

How to influence safe behaviour through Brain Based Safety

Brain Based Safety comes to Petroleum Safety Conference (PSC)

Safety is complicated and yet for years, safety professionals have looked for magic formulas to reduce workplace injuries, deaths and damages.

Juni Daalmans, the founder and owner of Brain Based Safety in the Netherlands, says effective safety formulas are based on attitudes and behaviours: how we think affects how we act. Continue reading

Black Hawk combat veteran to speak about leadership

Leadership has long been recognized as a key part of safety culture.

And Keni Thomas knows all about leadership.

When the combat veteran speaks at Enform’s Petroleum Safety Conference May 2-4, 2017 in Banff, his audience will hear compelling stories of how taking charge helped save his and other lives in war.

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How to beat the big ice challenge – on and off the job

Ice makes work in the oil and gas industry bone-chilling for two reasons: one—it’s cold and, two, it’s a slippery and unpredictable hazard.

“The biggest challenge with ice,” says Dave Hanik, a Drumheller, Alberta-based lead mechanic for the Clearwater Business Unit at Encana, “is that you often can’t see it, so you face the unexpected. You may be walking and all of a sudden you start sliding sideways. You might miss an access road in your vehicle and then find yourself sliding on black ice. A pipeline might be frozen, but you don’t know exactly where.”

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